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Fever in children

A fever is a high temperature of 38C or more. It's not usually a sign of anything serious and children over 3 months can often be treated at home.

A fever is a high temperature of 38C or more. A child with a fever may also be hot, sweaty and have red cheeks.

You can usually treat a fever by making sure your child rests and drinks plenty of fluids. Get medical advice if you're worried about your child.

Read more on the NHS website.

A fever is a high temperature of 38C or more. A child with a fever may also be hot, sweaty and have red cheeks.

Checking a high temperature

Your child might:

Use a digital thermometer, which you can buy from pharmacies and supermarkets, to take your child's temperature.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can usually treat a fever by making sure your child rests and drinks plenty of fluids. Get medical advice if you're worried about your child.

Self-care

You can usually look after your child or baby at home. The temperature should go down over 3 or 4 days.


Do

  • give them plenty of fluids

  • look out for signs of dehydration

  • give them food if they want it

  • check on your child regularly during the night

  • keep them at home

  • give them paracetamol or ibuprofen if they're distressed or unwell

  • get medical advice if you're worried about your child


Don't

  • do not undress your child or sponge them down to cool them – fever is a natural and healthy response to infection

  • do not cover them up in too many clothes or bedclothes

  • do not give aspirin to under-16s

  • do not combine ibuprofen and paracetamol, unless a GP tells you to

  • do not give paracetamol to a child under 2 months

  • do not give ibuprofen to a child under 3 months or under 5kg

  • do not give ibuprofen to children with asthma

Read more on the NHS website.