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Vaccinations

Overview

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The 6-in-1 vaccine helps protect against serious illnesses like polio and whooping cough. It's given to babies when they're 8, 12 and 16 weeks old.

The 6-in-1 vaccine protects babies against diphtheria, hepatitis B, Hib (haemophilus influenzae type b), polio, tetanus and whooping cough.

The 6-in-1 vaccine is for babies. They're given a dose of the vaccine at 8 weeks old, 12 weeks old and 16 weeks old.

Most babies can have the 6-in-1 vaccine. They only cannot have it if they've had a serious allergic reaction to the vaccine or an ingredient in it.

You can check the ingredients in the 6-in-1 vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Your GP surgery will usually contact you to arrange your child's 6-in-1 vaccinations. Speak to your GP surgery if you have not been contacted.

Common side effects of the 6-in-1 vaccine include swelling or pain where the injection was given, a high temperature, tiredness and loss of appetite.

The pneumococcal vaccine protects against serious illnesses like pneumonia and sepsis. It's recommended for people at higher risk of these illnesses.

The pneumococcal vaccine helps protect against some types of infections that can cause serious illnesses like meningitis, sepsis and pneumonia.

The pneumococcal vaccine is for babies, adults aged 65 and over, and people at higher risk of getting seriously ill from pneumococcal infections.

Most people who need it can have the pneumococcal vaccine. You cannot have it if you've had a serious allergic reaction to it or an ingredient in it.

You can check the ingredients in the pneumococcal vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Your GP surgery should contact you to arrange you or your child's pneumococcal vaccinations. Welders and metal workers should speak to their employer.

Side effects of the pneumococcal vaccine include swelling or pain where the injection was given, a high temperature, tiredness and loss of appetite.

The pneumococcal vaccine gives some protection by about 3 weeks from when you've had it. Most adults only need 1 dose for long-term protection.

Babies are offered the MenB vaccine to protect them against serious bacterial infections such as meningitis and sepsis.

Babies are given a dose of the MenB vaccine when they’re 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 1 year old.

Your GP surgery or clinic will send you an appointment for your baby to have their MenB vaccination along with their other routine vaccinations.

The MenB vaccine is safe. Since it was licensed in 2015, almost 5 million doses have been given with no safety concerns identified.

Your baby may get a high temperature after having the MenB vaccine. Give them liquid paracetamol to help avoid this.

The MenB vaccine is very effective. It protects against most types of meningococcal group B bacteria found in the UK.

The rotavirus vaccine is recommended for babies because rotavirus spreads very easily and can make some babies very ill.

The rotavirus vaccine is for babies. They're given a dose of the vaccine at 8 weeks old and 12 weeks old.

A small number of babies cannot have the rotavirus vaccine, such as babies with a rare condition called severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

You can check the ingredients in the rotavirus vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Your GP surgery will usually contact you to arrange your baby's rotavirus vaccinations. Speak to your GP surgery if you have not been contacted.

The rotavirus vaccine is a liquid that is squirted into your baby's mouth. They may need to be given another dose if they spit it out straight away.

The most common side effects of the rotavirus vaccine are diarrhoea and irritability. More serious side effects are very rare.

About 8 out of every 10 babies who have the rotavirus vaccine will be protected from diarrhoea and vomiting caused by rotavirus.

The hepatitis B vaccine helps protect against the hepatitis B virus. It’s recommended for some people at high risk of getting the infection.

Babies are vaccinated against hepatitis B as part of the routine 6-in-1 vaccine. Some babies and adults need extra doses of the hepatitis B vaccine.

Side effects after having the hepatitis B vaccine are rare, but may include some redness and soreness where the injection was given.

The hepatitis B vaccine protects about 9 in every 10 people who have it.

The BCG vaccine helps protect against an infection called tuberculosis (TB), which can be serious if not treated.

The BCG vaccine is recommended for people at higher risk of getting tuberculosis, such as babies living in parts of the UK where the risk is higher.

Some people cannot have the BCG vaccine, including people who are pregnant or have a weakened immune system.

You can check the ingredients in the BCG vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Your baby or child may be offered the BCG vaccine if they are eligible. Speak to your GP surgery if you think you or your child need the vaccine.

The BCG vaccine is injected into your upper arm. You may need a skin test before the injection to make sure you've not had tuberculosis (TB) before.

The main side effect of the BCG vaccine is a blister where the vaccine is given, which leaves a small scar. Serious side effects are very rare.

The shingles vaccine is used to reduce your chances of getting shingles and of getting serious problems if you do get shingles.

The shingles vaccine is recommended for some older adults (including everyone aged 70 to 79) and some people with a severely weakened immune system.

Most people can have the shingles vaccine. You only need to avoid it if you've had a serious allergic reaction to the vaccine, or an ingredient in it.

You can check the ingredients in the shingles vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Your GP surgery will usually contact you when you become eligible for the shingles vaccine.

Common side effects of the shingles vaccine include swelling or pain where the injection was given. Serious side effects are very rare.

The Td/IPV vaccine helps protect against 3 serious illnesses called tetanus, diphtheria and polio.

The Td/IPV vaccine is recommended for children in school year 9 and people at higher risk of tetanus, diphtheria or polio.

Most people can have the Td/IPV vaccine. You only need to avoid it if you've had a serious allergic reaction to the vaccine or an ingredient in it.

You can check the ingredients in the Td/IPV vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Children are given the Td/IPV vaccine at school. If you need it for travel, you can get it from some travel clinics, pharmacies or GP surgeries.

Common side effects of the Td/IPV vaccine include swelling or pain where the injection was given. Serious side effects are very rare.

The 4-in-1 pre-school booster helps protect against diphtheria, polio, tetanus and whooping cough.

The 4-in-1 pre-school booster is given to children aged 3 years, 4 months old before they start school.

Most children can have the 4-in-1 pre-school booster. They cannot have it if they've had a serious allergic reaction to an ingredient in it.

You can check the ingredients in the 4-in-1 pre-school booster by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Your GP surgery will usually contact you to arrange your child's 4-in-1 pre-school booster. Speak to your GP surgery if you have not been contacted.

Side effects of the 4-in-1 pre-school booster include swelling or pain where the injection was given, feeling tired and a high temperature.

The Hib/MenC vaccine helps prevent Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C, which are serious, life-threatening bacterial infections.

1 year old babies are given the Hib/MenC vaccine as part of the NHS vaccination schedule, but it can be given up to the age of 10 if needed.

Most children can have the Hib/MenC vaccine. They only need to avoid it if they've had a reaction to an ingredient in it or to the 6-in-1 vaccine.

You can check the ingredients in the Hib/MenC vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Your GP surgery will usually contact you to arrange your child's Hib/MenC vaccination. Speak to your GP surgery if you've not been contacted.

The Hib/MenC vaccine is given as an injection into the arm or thigh. It can be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Common side effects of the Hib/MenC vaccine include pain and swelling where the injection is given, a slightly high temperature and feeling irritable.

The HPV vaccine can help reduce your chances of getting certain types of cancer, such as cervical cancer, mouth cancer and penile cancer.

The HPV vaccine is for children aged 12 to 13 years old and people at higher risk from HPV, such as men under 45 who have sex with men.

Most people can have the HPV vaccine. You only need to avoid it if you've had a serious allergic reaction to the vaccine, or an ingredient in it.

You can check the ingredients in the HPV vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Children aged 12 to 13 usually have the HPV vaccine at school. People at higher risk from HPV can get the vaccine from sexual health or HIV clinics.

Most people under 25 only need 1 dose of the HPV vaccine. Older people and those with weakened immune systems usually need 2 or 3 doses.

Common side effects of the HPV vaccine include swelling or pain where the injection was given. Serious side effects are very rare.

The HPV vaccines works very well in helping prevent HPV. There has been a big drop in cancers linked to HPV since the vaccine has been used in the UK.

The MMR vaccine is offered to children to protect them against serious and highly infectious illnesses called measles, mumps and rubella.

Babies are given the 1st dose of the MMR vaccine when they’re 1 year old. They’re given the 2nd dose at 3 years and 4 months.

After 2 doses of the MMR vaccine, almost all children are protected against measles and rubella, and almost 9 in every 10 are protected against mumps.

After the MMR vaccine, there may be some redness and swelling where the injection is given. Babies or young children may also have a high temperature.

The main ingredient of the MMR vaccine is a small amount of weakened measles, mumps and rubella viruses.

Children are offered the flu vaccine because it can sometimes cause serious problems such as pneumonia. Vaccinating them also helps protect others.

The children's flu vaccine is for children aged 2 to 3 years, school-aged children (Reception to Year 11) and children with certain health conditions.

Most children who need it can have the flu vaccine. Children cannot have it if they've had a serious allergic reaction to it or an ingredient in it.

You can check the ingredients in the children's flu vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Most school-aged children (Reception to Year 11) get their flu vaccine at school. Children aged 2 to 3 years old get the vaccine at their GP surgery.

The children's flu vaccine is a nasal spray given in each nostril. Children who cannot have the nasal spray will get a flu vaccine given by injection.

Side effects of the children's nasal spray flu vaccine include a blocked or runny nose, loss of appetite, feeling tired and a headache.

The children's flu vaccine aims to protect children against common flu viruses. They might still get flu, but it's likely to be less serious.

The flu vaccine is recommended for people at higher risk from flu, including all adults aged 65 and over and people with certain health conditions.

Most people can get a flu vaccine from a GP surgery or some pharmacies. Some people get it through their employer, care home or an antenatal clinic.

Most people who need it can have the flu vaccine. You cannot have it if you've had a serious allergic reaction to it or an ingredient in it.

You can check the ingredients in the flu vaccine by asking to see the patient leaflet or searching for it online.

Side effects of the flu vaccine include pain or soreness where the injection was given, a slightly raised temperature and an aching body.

The flu vaccine helps protect you against common types of flu viruses. There's still a chance you might get flu, but it's likely to be milder.

Page last reviewed: 01/01/1970
Next review due: 01/01/1970