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Transient ischaemic attack (TIA)

A transient ischaemic attack, also called a "mini stroke", is a serious condition where the blood supply to your brain is temporarily disrupted.

Common symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack include your face dropping on 1 side, not being able to lift your arms, and speech problems.

Transient ischaemic attacks are usually caused by a clot blocking the blood supply to the brain. They're often linked to an unhealthy lifestyle.

Treatments often used after a transient ischaemic attack include medicines to prevent blood clots and surgery to improve blood supply to the brain.

You can reduce your risk of transient ischaemic attacks by eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly and not smoking.

Read more on the NHS website.

Common symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack include your face dropping on 1 side, not being able to lift your arms, and speech problems.

Symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack (TIA)

The main symptoms of a TIA can be remembered with the word FAST:

Read more on the NHS website.

Treatments often used after a transient ischaemic attack include medicines to prevent blood clots and surgery to improve blood supply to the brain.

Medical treatments

Although the symptoms of a TIA resolve in a few minutes or hours, you'll need treatment to help prevent another TIA or a full stroke happening in the future.

Treatment will depend on your individual circumstances, such as your age and medical history.

You're likely to be given advice about lifestyle changes you can make to reduce your stroke risk, and be offered medicine to treat the cause of the TIA.

In some cases, a surgery called a carotid endarterectomy may be needed to unblock your carotid arteries, which are the main blood vessels that supply your brain with blood.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can reduce your risk of transient ischaemic attacks by eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly and not smoking.

Read more on the NHS website.

Transient ischaemic attacks are usually caused by a clot blocking the blood supply to the brain. They're often linked to an unhealthy lifestyle.

Read more on the NHS website.