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Raynaud's

Raynaud's affects your blood circulation. It causes some areas of your body to feel cold, sore or numb, or change colour.

If you have Raynaud's, your fingers or toes may change colour when you're cold, anxious or stressed. They may also feel sore or numb.

You can help Raynaud's by keeping your hands and feet warm and finding ways to relax. Some people need medicine to help improve their circulation.

Read more on the NHS website.

If you have Raynaud's, your fingers or toes may change colour when you're cold, anxious or stressed. They may also feel sore or numb.

Check if it's Raynaud's

Raynaud's affects your blood circulation. When you're cold, anxious or stressed, your fingers and toes may change colour.

Other symptoms can include:

Raynaud's 1
The skin may turn white or a lighter colour as blood flow is restricted

Raynaud's 2
Sometimes the skin turns blue as blood vessels react

Raynaud's 3
The skin may turn red as blood flow returns

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Raynaud's may make your fingertips appear paler if you have dark skin

Some people also find that their ears, nose, lips or nipples are affected.

The symptoms of Raynaud's may last from a few minutes to a few hours.

Raynaud's is sometimes caused by another health condition, taking certain medicines, or working with vibrating tools for a long time.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can help Raynaud's by keeping your hands and feet warm and finding ways to relax. Some people need medicine to help improve their circulation.

Self-care


Do

  • keep your home warm

  • wear warm clothes during cold weather, especially on your hands and feet

  • exercise regularly – this helps improve circulation

  • try breathing exercises or yoga to help you relax

  • eat a healthy, balanced diet


Don't

  • do not smoke – improve your circulation by stopping smoking

  • do not have too much caffeine (found in tea, coffee, cola and chocolate) – it may trigger the symptoms of Raynaud's

Medical treatments

If your symptoms are very bad or getting worse, a GP may prescribe a medicine to help improve your circulation, such as nifedipine, which is used to treat high blood pressure.

Some people need to take this medicine every day. Others only use it to prevent Raynaud's – for example, during cold weather.

A GP may arrange tests if they think Raynaud's could be a sign of a more serious condition, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus.

Read more on the NHS website.