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Epididymitis

Epididymitis is where a tube (the epididymis) at the back of your testicles becomes painful and swollen.

The main symptom of epididymitis is pain and swelling in 1 or both testicles.

Epididymitis is usually caused by a sexually transmitted infection or urinary tract infection.

Epididymitis is treated with antibiotics. Painkillers and cold packs (or a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a tea towel) can help with the pain.

Read more on the NHS website.

The main symptom of epididymitis is pain and swelling in 1 or both testicles.

Check if it's epididymitis

Symptoms of epididymitis may include:

You may have other symptoms depending on the cause, such as difficulty peeing, or a white, yellow or green discharge from the tip of the penis.

Read more on the NHS website.

Epididymitis is treated with antibiotics. Painkillers and cold packs (or a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a tea towel) can help with the pain.

Medical treatments

If you have an infection, you'll usually be given antibiotics. You should start to feel better within a few days, but it may take up to 2 weeks to fully recover.

It's important to finish the whole course of antibiotics, even if you start to feel better.

There are some things you can do while you recover to help ease pain and swelling and prevent any further problems.


Do

  • take painkillers, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen, to help with the pain – if you have a history of fits, NSAIDs such as ibuprofen should not be taken with some antibiotics used to treat epididymitis; speak to a pharmacist about the best painkiller to use if you’re unsure

  • hold a cold pack (or a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a tea towel) on your groin

  • wear underwear that supports your scrotum


Don't

  • do not have sex if you have gonorrhoea or chlamydia until you have finished the full course of treatment

Read more on the NHS website.

Epididymitis is usually caused by a sexually transmitted infection or urinary tract infection.

Read more on the NHS website.