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Eating disorders

Eating disorders, like anorexia, are mental health conditions where unhealthy eating behaviours are used to cope with difficult feelings and issues.

Symptoms of an eating disorder include worrying about your weight, eating too little or making yourself sick after eating.

Treatment for an eating disorder depends on the type of condition you have plus your symptoms. It usually involves talking therapy.

Anyone can get an eating disorder but things that make it more likely include family problems, depression or dealing with difficult things like death.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of an eating disorder include worrying about your weight, eating too little or making yourself sick after eating.

Check if you have an eating disorder

If you or people around you are worried that you have an unhealthy relationship with food, you could have an eating disorder.

Symptoms of eating disorders include:

You may also notice physical signs, including:

Read more on the NHS website.

Treatment for an eating disorder depends on the type of condition you have plus your symptoms. It usually involves talking therapy.

Medical treatments

You can recover from an eating disorder, but it may take time and recovery will be different for everyone.

If you're referred to an eating disorder specialist or team of specialists, they'll be responsible for your care.

They should talk to you about the support you might need, such as for other conditions you have, and include this in your treatment plan.

Your treatment will depend on the type of eating disorder you have, but usually includes a talking therapy.

You may also need regular health checks if your eating disorder is having an impact on your physical health.

Your treatment may also involve working through a guided self-help programme if you have bulimia or binge eating disorder.

Most people will be offered individual therapy, but those with binge eating disorder may be offered group therapy.

Read more on the NHS website.

Anyone can get an eating disorder but things that make it more likely include family problems, depression or dealing with difficult things like death.

Read more on the NHS website.