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Blisters

Blisters are fluid-filled bumps under your skin that you can get if your skin is damaged.

A blister will usually heal on its own if you cover it with a plaster or dressing and do not burst it. If it's very big or painful, a GP may drain it.

Blisters are lumps under your skin that can be filled with clear fluid, blood or pus.

Read more on the NHS website.

Blisters are lumps under your skin that can be filled with clear fluid, blood or pus.

Check if you have a blister

Blister 1
Blisters are small pockets of clear fluid under a layer of skin

Blister 2
Blood blisters may look red or black and are filled with blood instead of clear fluid

Blister 3
An infected blister can be hot and filled with green or yellow pus. The surrounding skin may look red, but this can be hard to see on darker skin tones

Important

Do not ignore an infected blister. Without treatment it could lead to a skin or blood infection.

Read more on the NHS website.

A blister will usually heal on its own if you cover it with a plaster or dressing and do not burst it. If it's very big or painful, a GP may drain it.

Self-care

To protect the blister and help prevent infection:


Do

  • cover blisters with a soft plaster or padded dressing

  • wash your hands before touching a burst blister

  • allow the fluid in a burst blister to drain before covering it with a plaster or dressing


Don't

  • do not burst a blister yourself

  • do not peel the skin off a burst blister

  • do not pick at the edges of the remaining skin

  • do not wear the shoes or use the equipment that caused your blister until it heals

Medical treatments

A GP might burst a large or painful blister using a sterilised needle. If your blister is infected, they may prescribe antibiotics.

They can also offer treatment and advice if blisters are caused by a medical condition.

Read more on the NHS website.