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Gum disease

Gum disease is where your gums are red and swollen.

Symptoms of gum disease include bleeding gums, swollen gums and bad breath.

Brushing your teeth twice a day and flossing regularly can help gum disease. A dental hygienist may need to thoroughly clean your teeth.

Gum disease is caused by a build-up of a sticky substance called plaque on your teeth. This can happen if you do not brush your teeth regularly.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of gum disease include bleeding gums, swollen gums and bad breath.

Early symptoms of gum disease

Gum disease is not always painful and you may be unaware you have it.

The initial symptoms of gum disease can include:

This stage of gum disease is called gingivitis.

Advanced symptoms

If gingivitis is untreated, the tissues and bone that support the teeth can also become affected. This is known as periodontitis, or periodontal disease.

Symptoms of periodontitis can include:

Read more on the NHS website.

Brushing your teeth twice a day and flossing regularly can help gum disease. A dental hygienist may need to thoroughly clean your teeth.

Medical treatments

Mild cases of gum disease can usually be treated by maintaining a good level of oral hygiene.

This includes brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing regularly.

You should also make sure you go for regular dental check-ups.

In most cases, your dentist or dental hygienist will be able to give your teeth a thorough clean and remove any hardened plaque (tartar).

They'll also be able to show you how to clean your teeth effectively to help prevent plaque building up in the future.

If you have severe gum disease, you'll usually need to have further medical and dental treatment.

In some cases, surgery may need to be carried out. This will usually be performed by a specialist in gum problems (periodontics).

Read more on the NHS website.

Gum disease is caused by a build-up of a sticky substance called plaque on your teeth. This can happen if you do not brush your teeth regularly.

Read more on the NHS website.