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Anal cancer

Anal cancer is a type of cancer that affects your bottom (anus).

Symptoms of anal cancer include bleeding, itching and pain in your bottom (anus).

The main treatments for anal cancer are chemoradiation (a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy) and surgery.

The exact cause of anal cancer is unknown. The risk of getting it increases as you get older, with half of all cases affecting people aged 65 or over.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of anal cancer include bleeding, itching and pain in your bottom (anus).

Symptoms of anal cancer

The symptoms of anal cancer are often similar to more common and less serious conditions affecting the anus, such as piles (haemorrhoids) and small tears or sores called anal fissures.

Symptoms of anal cancer can include:

Some people with anal cancer do not have any symptoms.

See a GP if you develop any of these symptoms. While they're unlikely to be caused by anal cancer, it's best to get them checked out.

Read more on the NHS website.

The main treatments for anal cancer are chemoradiation (a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy) and surgery.

Medical treatments

If you're diagnosed with anal cancer, you'll be cared for by a team of different specialists who work together to provide the best treatment and care.

The main treatments used for anal cancer are:

  • chemoradiation – a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy
  • surgery – to remove a tumour or a larger section of bowel

If the cancer has spread and cannot be cured, chemotherapy alone may be considered to help relieve symptoms. This is known as palliative care.

Read more on the NHS website.

The exact cause of anal cancer is unknown. The risk of getting it increases as you get older, with half of all cases affecting people aged 65 or over.

Read more on the NHS website.