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Hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar)

Hyperglycaemia is where the level of sugar in your blood gets too high. It mainly affects people with diabetes.

Symptoms of hyperglycaemia include feeling thirsty, peeing a lot, tiredness and breath that smells fruity.

Hyperglycaemia can usually be treated by making changes to your diet, such as cutting down on sugary food and drink.

In people with diabetes, hyperglycaemia can be triggered by things like stress, being ill, not getting enough exercise or eating too much.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of hyperglycaemia include feeling thirsty, peeing a lot, tiredness and breath that smells fruity.

Symptoms of hyperglycaemia

Symptoms of hyperglycaemia in people with diabetes tend to develop slowly over a few days or weeks.

In some cases, there may be no symptoms until the blood sugar level is very high.

Symptoms of hyperglycaemia include:

Symptoms of hyperglycaemia can also be caused by undiagnosed diabetes, so see a GP if this applies to you. You can have a test to check for the condition.

Read more on the NHS website.

Hyperglycaemia can usually be treated by making changes to your diet, such as cutting down on sugary food and drink.

Medical treatments

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes and have symptoms of hyperglycaemia, follow the advice your care team has given you to reduce your blood sugar level.

If you're not sure what to do, contact a GP or your care team.

You may be advised to:

  • change your diet – for example, you may be advised to avoid foods that cause your blood sugar levels to rise, such as cakes or sugary drinks
  • drink plenty of sugar-free fluids – this can help if you're dehydrated
  • exercise more often – gentle, regular exercise such as walking can often lower your blood sugar level, particularly if it helps you lose weight
  • if you use insulin, adjust your dose – your care team can give you specific advice about how to do this

You may also be advised to monitor your blood sugar level more closely, or test your blood or urine for substances called ketones (associated with diabetic ketoacidosis).

Until your blood sugar level is back under control, watch out for additional symptoms that could be a sign of a more serious condition.

Read more on the NHS website.

In people with diabetes, hyperglycaemia can be triggered by things like stress, being ill, not getting enough exercise or eating too much.

Read more on the NHS website.