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Treatment

Trigger finger is a condition that affects the tendons in your hand. It can make it hard to bend your fingers or thumb.

Trigger finger symptoms include pain, stiffness or clicking when you move your finger or thumb. It may also sometimes get stuck in a bent position.

Treatments for trigger finger include painkillers, wearing a plastic splint on your hand, steroid injections and sometimes surgery.

Trigger finger can happen if a tendon or the area around a tendon in your hand becomes inflamed and swollen.

Read more on the NHS website.

Trigger finger symptoms include pain, stiffness or clicking when you move your finger or thumb. It may also sometimes get stuck in a bent position.

Symptoms of trigger finger

Symptoms of trigger finger can include pain at the base of the affected finger or thumb when you move it or press on it, and stiffness or clicking when you move the affected finger or thumb, particularly first thing in the morning.

If the condition gets worse, your finger may get stuck in a bent position and then suddenly pop straight. Eventually, it may not fully bend or straighten.

See your GP if you think you may have trigger finger. They'll examine your hand and advise you about appropriate treatments.

Read more on the NHS website.

Treatments for trigger finger include painkillers, wearing a plastic splint on your hand, steroid injections and sometimes surgery.

Medical treatments

In some people, trigger finger may get better without treatment.

However, if it is not treated, there's a chance the affected finger or thumb could become permanently bent, which will make performing everyday tasks difficult.

If treatment is necessary, several options are available, including:

  • rest – avoiding certain activities
  • medication – taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may help relieve pain
  • splinting – where the affected finger is strapped to a plastic splint to reduce movement
  • steroid injections – steroids are medicines that can reduce swelling
  • surgery on the affected hand – surgery can help allow the affected tendon to move freely again

Surgery is usually only used when other treatments have failed. It can be up to 100% effective, although you may need to take 2 to 4 weeks off work to fully recover.

Read more on the NHS website.

Trigger finger can happen if a tendon or the area around a tendon in your hand becomes inflamed and swollen.

Read more on the NHS website.