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Diagnosis

Vulval cancer is a rare type of cancer that affects the vulva, the outside parts of the female genitals.

Vulval cancer can cause itchiness, pain and changes in the appearance of your vulva.

Surgery is the main treatment for vulval cancer. Other treatments include radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

It's not clear exactly what causes vulval cancer. It's been linked to things like getting older, smoking and skin conditions affecting the vulva.

It's not possible to completely prevent vulval cancer. But using a condom during sex, attending cervical screening checks and not smoking can help.

Read more on the NHS website.

Vulval cancer can cause itchiness, pain and changes in the appearance of your vulva.

Symptoms of vulval cancer

Symptoms of vulval cancer can include:

See a GP if you notice any changes in the usual appearance of your vulva.

While it's highly unlikely to be the result of cancer, these changes should be investigated.

Read more on the NHS website.

Surgery is the main treatment for vulval cancer. Other treatments include radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

Medical treatments

The main treatment for vulval cancer is surgery to remove the cancerous tissue from the vulva and any lymph nodes containing cancerous cells.

Some people may also have radiotherapy, where radiation is used to destroy cancer cells, or chemotherapy, where medicine is used to kill cancer cells, or both.

Radiotherapy and chemotherapy may be used without surgery if you're not well enough to have an operation, or if the cancer has spread and it's not possible to remove it all.

Read more on the NHS website.

It's not possible to completely prevent vulval cancer. But using a condom during sex, attending cervical screening checks and not smoking can help.

Read more on the NHS website.

It's not clear exactly what causes vulval cancer. It's been linked to things like getting older, smoking and skin conditions affecting the vulva.

Read more on the NHS website.