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Motor neurone disease

Motor neurone disease is an uncommon condition affecting the brain and nerves. It's nearly always fatal, but some people live with it for many years.

Symptoms of motor neurone disease include muscle weakness, twitches, slurred speech and difficulty swallowing. The symptoms get worse over time.

Treatment for motor neurone disease aims to ease the symptoms as much as possible. Treatments include physiotherapy, speech therapy and medicines.

Motor neurone disease happens when cells in the brain and nerves, called motor neurones, gradually stop working. It's not known why this happens.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of motor neurone disease include muscle weakness, twitches, slurred speech and difficulty swallowing. The symptoms get worse over time.

Symptoms of motor neurone disease

Symptoms of motor neurone disease come on gradually and may not be obvious at first.

Early symptoms can include:

Read more on the NHS website.

Treatment for motor neurone disease aims to ease the symptoms as much as possible. Treatments include physiotherapy, speech therapy and medicines.

Medical treatments

There's no cure for motor neurone disease, but treatment can help reduce the impact the symptoms have on your life.

You'll be cared for by a team of specialists and a GP.

Treatments include:

  • highly specialised clinics, typically involving a specialist nurse and occupational therapy to help make everyday tasks easier
  • physiotherapy and exercises to maintain strength and reduce stiffness
  • advice from a speech and language therapist
  • advice from a dietitian about diet and eating
  • a medicine called riluzole that can slightly slow down the progression of the condition
  • medicines to relieve muscle stiffness and help with saliva problems
  • emotional support for you and your carer

Read more on the NHS website.

Motor neurone disease happens when cells in the brain and nerves, called motor neurones, gradually stop working. It's not known why this happens.

Read more on the NHS website.