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Treatment

Pneumonia is inflammation of the lungs, usually caused by an infection.

Symptoms of pneumonia include a cough, difficulty breathing, a high temperature and chest pain.

Pneumonia is usually treated with antibiotics from a GP. Severe pneumonia may need to be treated in hospital.

Pneumonia is usually caused by a bacterial infection. It can also be caused by other infections or things like food or vomit getting in your lungs.

The pneumococcal and flu vaccines can help prevent pneumonia. These vaccines are offered on the NHS for some people at high risk.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of pneumonia include a cough, difficulty breathing, a high temperature and chest pain.

Symptoms of pneumonia

The symptoms of pneumonia can develop suddenly over 24 to 48 hours, or they may come on more slowly over several days.

Common symptoms of pneumonia include:

Less common symptoms include:

Read more on the NHS website.

Pneumonia is usually treated with antibiotics from a GP. Severe pneumonia may need to be treated in hospital.

Medical treatments

Mild pneumonia can usually be treated at home by:

  • getting plenty of rest
  • taking antibiotics
  • drinking plenty of fluids

If you do not have any other health problems, you should respond well to treatment and soon recover, although your cough may last for some time.

It's usually safe for someone with pneumonia to be around others, including family members.

But people with a weakened immune system are less able to fight off infections, so it's best they avoid close contact with a person with pneumonia.

For at-risk groups, pneumonia can be severe and may need to be treated in hospital.

This is because it can lead to serious complications, which in some cases can be fatal, depending on a person's health and age.

Read more on the NHS website.

The pneumococcal and flu vaccines can help prevent pneumonia. These vaccines are offered on the NHS for some people at high risk.

Read more on the NHS website.

Pneumonia is usually caused by a bacterial infection. It can also be caused by other infections or things like food or vomit getting in your lungs.

Read more on the NHS website.