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Complications

Pre-eclampsia is a condition that causes high blood pressure during pregnancy and after labour. It can be serious if not treated.

Early signs of pre-eclampsia include high blood pressure and protein in your pee. These are usually picked up during pregnancy appointments.

If you have pre-eclampsia you'll have regular check-ups that may require a stay in hospital. You may also need medicine to lower your blood pressure.

Read more on the NHS website.

Early signs of pre-eclampsia include high blood pressure and protein in your pee. These are usually picked up during pregnancy appointments.

Symptoms of pre-eclampsia

Early signs of pre-eclampsia include having high blood pressure (hypertension) and protein in your urine (proteinuria). 

It's unlikely that you'll notice these signs, but they should be picked up during your routine antenatal appointments.

In some cases, further symptoms can develop, including:

If you notice any symptoms of pre-eclampsia, seek medical advice immediately by calling your midwife, GP surgery or NHS 111.

Although many cases are mild, the condition can lead to serious complications for both mother and baby if it's not monitored and treated. 

The earlier pre-eclampsia is diagnosed and monitored, the better the outlook for mother and baby.

Read more on the NHS website.

If you have pre-eclampsia you'll have regular check-ups that may require a stay in hospital. You may also need medicine to lower your blood pressure.

Medical treatments

If you're diagnosed with pre-eclampsia, you should be referred for an assessment by a specialist, usually in hospital.

While in hospital, you'll be monitored closely to determine how severe the condition is and whether a hospital stay is needed.

The only way to cure pre-eclampsia is to deliver the baby, so you'll usually be monitored regularly until it's possible for your baby to be delivered.

This will normally be at around 37 to 38 weeks of pregnancy, but it may be earlier in more severe cases.

At this point, labour may be started artificially (induced) or you may have a caesarean section.

Medication may be recommended to lower your blood pressure while you wait for your baby to be delivered.

Read more on the NHS website.