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Tendonitis

Tendonitis is the swelling of a tendon, which is a thick cord attaching a muscle to a bone. It can cause joint pain and stiffness.

Symptoms of tendonitis include pain, stiffness and swelling in a joint.

You can usually treat tendonitis with rest, ice packs, compression and elevation. A GP may prescribe painkillers or recommend physiotherapy.

Tendonitis is most often caused by sudden movements or repetitive exercise, such as running, jumping or throwing.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of tendonitis include pain, stiffness and swelling in a joint.

Check if it's tendonitis

There are tendons all over your body. They connect your muscles to bones, for example in your knees, elbows and shoulders.

The main symptoms of tendonitis are:

There are many different types of tendonitis, depending on which area of the body is affected.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can usually treat tendonitis with rest, ice packs, compression and elevation. A GP may prescribe painkillers or recommend physiotherapy.

Self-care

Follow the 4 steps known as RICE therapy for 2 to 3 days to help bring down swelling and support the injury:

  1. Rest – stop the exercise or activities that caused the injury until you feel better
  2. Ice – put an ice pack (you could use a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a tea towel) on the injury for up to 20 minutes every 2 to 3 hours
  3. Compress – wrap a bandage around the injury to support it
  4. Elevate – if possible, keep the injured area raised on a pillow when sitting or lying down

To help prevent swelling during the first 2 to 3 days, try to avoid:

  • heat, such as hot baths and heat packs
  • alcohol
  • massages

When you can move the injured area without pain stopping you, try to keep moving it so the tendon does not become stiff.

Medical treatments

Your doctor may prescribe a stronger painkiller or cream or gel to bring down the swelling.

If your injury is severe or lasts a long time, you may be offered physiotherapy. You can also choose to book appointments privately.

You may be referred to hospital for a scan if your doctor thinks you could have another injury, such as a broken bone.

Some people with long-term or severe tendonitis may be offered:

  • steroid injections – which may provide short-term pain relief
  • surgery – to remove damaged tissue or repair a ruptured tendon
  • shockwave therapy – which may help speed up healing
  • platelet rich plasma injections (PRP) – which may help speed up healing

Read more on the NHS website.

Tendonitis is most often caused by sudden movements or repetitive exercise, such as running, jumping or throwing.

Read more on the NHS website.