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Goitre

A goitre is a swelling of the thyroid gland that causes a lump in the front of your neck.

Goitres are usually small and do not cause symptoms. A large goitre may cause coughing, a tight throat, hoarseness and difficulty swallowing.

Treatments for a goitre include medicines, hormone therapy and sometimes surgery. Goitres with no symptoms do not usually need treatment.

Causes for a goitre include problems with your thyroid gland, puberty, the menopause and not enough iodine in your diet.

Read more on the NHS website.

Goitres are usually small and do not cause symptoms. A large goitre may cause coughing, a tight throat, hoarseness and difficulty swallowing.

Symptoms of a goitre

The size of a goitre can vary from person to person. In most cases, the swelling is small and does not cause any symptoms.

In more severe cases, symptoms may include:

Read more on the NHS website.

Treatments for a goitre include medicines, hormone therapy and sometimes surgery. Goitres with no symptoms do not usually need treatment.

Medical treatments

The treatment for a goitre depends on the underlying cause.

If the goitre is small and not causing any problems, a wait-and-see approach is usually recommended.

Other possible treatments include radioiodine treatment and thyroid surgery.

Although most goitres are non-cancerous, it's estimated that in 1 in 20 cases they may be a sign of thyroid cancer.

Read more on the NHS website.

Causes for a goitre include problems with your thyroid gland, puberty, the menopause and not enough iodine in your diet.

Read more on the NHS website.