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Treatment

Measles is a very contagious infection caused by a virus. It usually gets better on its own, but it can make some people very ill.

The main symptom of measles is a red-brown blotchy rash. You may have cold-like symptoms for a few days before the rash appears.

There's no specific treatment for measles. Rest, take painkillers and drink plenty of fluids to help ease the symptoms until it has run its course.

Measles is spread through coughs and sneezes. A person is most contagious from when symptoms develop until about 4 days after the rash first appears.

The MMR vaccine can prevent measles. The vaccine is given as part of the routine NHS childhood vaccination programme.

Read more on the NHS website.

The main symptom of measles is a red-brown blotchy rash. You may have cold-like symptoms for a few days before the rash appears.

Symptoms of measles

The initial symptoms of measles develop around 10 days after you're infected.

These can include:

A few days later, a red-brown blotchy rash will appear. This usually starts on the head or upper neck before spreading outwards to the rest of the body.

Read more on the NHS website.

There's no specific treatment for measles. Rest, take painkillers and drink plenty of fluids to help ease the symptoms until it has run its course.

Self-care

There are several things you can do to help relieve your symptoms and reduce the risk of spreading the infection.

These include:

  • taking paracetamol or ibuprofen to relieve fever, aches and pains (aspirin should not be given to children under 16 years old)
  • drinking plenty of water to avoid dehydration
  • closing the curtains to help reduce light sensitivity
  • using damp cotton wool to clean the eyes
  • staying off school or work for at least 4 days from when the rash first appears

In severe cases, especially if there are complications, you or your child may need to be admitted to hospital for treatment.

Read more on the NHS website.

The MMR vaccine can prevent measles. The vaccine is given as part of the routine NHS childhood vaccination programme.

Read more on the NHS website.

Measles is spread through coughs and sneezes. A person is most contagious from when symptoms develop until about 4 days after the rash first appears.

Read more on the NHS website.