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Lyme disease

Lyme disease is an infection caught from the bite of an infected tick.

Lyme disease can cause a circular red rash around a tick bite and flu-like symptoms.

Lyme disease is treated with antibiotics from a GP. The sooner you start treatment, the better your chances of a full recovery.

You can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease by covering your skin when you're outdoors, sticking to footpaths and using insect repellent.

Read more on the NHS website.

Lyme disease can cause a circular red rash around a tick bite and flu-like symptoms.

Symptoms of Lyme disease

Many people with early symptoms of Lyme disease develop a circular red skin rash around a tick bite.

The rash can appear up to 3 months after being bitten by a tick and usually lasts for several weeks.

Most rashes appear within the first 4 weeks.

A classic bull's-eye Lyme disease rash on an arm.The rash is often described as looking like a bull's-eye on a dartboard.

A circular red Lyme disease rash on an arm.The skin will be red and the edges may feel slightly raised.

Not everyone with Lyme disease gets the rash. Some people also have flu-like symptoms in the early stages, such as:

Read more on the NHS website.

Lyme disease is treated with antibiotics from a GP. The sooner you start treatment, the better your chances of a full recovery.

Medical treatments

If your GP thinks you might have Lyme disease, they'll prescribe a course of antibiotics.

The antibiotics you’re given will depend on your symptoms, but you may need to take them for up to 28 days. It's important to finish the course, even if you start to feel better.

Some people with severe symptoms will be referred to a specialist in hospital for injections of antibiotics.

Most people with Lyme disease get better after antibiotic treatment. This can take months for some people, but the symptoms should improve over time.

People with symptoms of Lyme disease that last a long time after treatment may be referred to a specialist in hospital for advice and more blood tests.

Important

Some websites offer tests and treatment for Lyme disease that may not be supported by scientific evidence.

Speak to your doctor for advice before buying tests or treatment online.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease by covering your skin when you're outdoors, sticking to footpaths and using insect repellent.

Read more on the NHS website.