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Anxiety disorders in children

It's normal for children to feel worried or anxious from time to time – such as when they're starting school or nursery, or moving to a new area.

But for some children, anxiety affects their behaviour and thoughts every day, interfering with their school, home and social life.

This is when you may need professional help to tackle it.

Symptoms of anxiety in children

Signs to look out for in your child are:

Separation anxiety is common in younger children, whereas older children and teenagers tend to worry more about school or have social anxiety.

How to help your anxious child

If your child is having problems with anxiety, there's plenty you can do to help.

Above all, it's important to talk to your child about their anxiety or worries.

See more self-help tips for parents of anxious children.

It's a good idea to seek professional help if your child is constantly anxious and:

Where to get help for anxiety

An appointment with your GP is a good place to start.

You can talk to the GP on your own or with your child, or your child might be able to have an appointment without you.

If the GP diagnoses your child with an anxiety disorder, they may refer them to the local child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS). CAMHS workers are trained to help young people with a wide range of problems, including anxiety.

If your child doesn't want to see a doctor, they may be able to get help directly from a local youth counselling service. For more information, visit Youth Access.

Treatments for anxiety disorders in children

The type of treatment offered will depend on your child's age and the cause of their anxiety.

Counselling can help your child understand what's making them anxious and allow them to work through the situation.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy that can help your child manage their anxiety by changing the way they think and behave. Learn more about CBT.

Anxiety medicines may be offered to your child if their anxiety is severe or doesn't get better with talking therapies. They are usually only prescribed by doctors who specialise in child and adolescent mental health.

What causes anxiety disorders in children

Some children are simply born more anxious and less able to cope with stress than others.

Children can also pick up anxious behaviour from being around anxious people.

Some children develop anxiety after stressful events, such as:

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autistic spectrum disorders are more likely to have problems with anxiety.

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