Skip to main content
Treatment

A migraine is a condition that often causes painful headaches.

A migraine can feel like a throbbing headache, usually on 1 side of the head. Other symptoms include feeling sick and sensitivity to light.

You can ease symptoms of a migraine with painkillers and medicines to stop you feeling sick. Lying down in a dark room may also help.

It's not entirely clear what causes migraines. They're known to be triggered by periods, stress, tiredness and certain foods or drinks.

You may be able to reduce your migraines by avoiding things that tend to cause them. Eating and sleeping well and regular exercise can also help.

Read more on the NHS website.

A migraine can feel like a throbbing headache, usually on 1 side of the head. Other symptoms include feeling sick and sensitivity to light.

Common symptoms of a migraine

The main symptom of a migraine is usually an intense headache on 1 side of the head.

The pain is usually a moderate or severe throbbing sensation that gets worse when you move and prevents you carrying out normal activities.

In some cases, the pain can occur on both sides of your head and may affect your face or neck.

Additional symptoms

Other symptoms commonly associated with a migraine include:

Some people also occasionally experience other symptoms, including:

Not everyone with a migraine experiences these additional symptoms and some people may experience them without having a headache.

The symptoms of a migraine usually last between 4 hours and 3 days, although you may feel very tired for up to a week afterwards.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can ease symptoms of a migraine with painkillers and medicines to stop you feeling sick. Lying down in a dark room may also help.

Medical treatments

There's no cure for migraines, but a number of treatments are available to help reduce the symptoms.

These include:

  • painkillers – including over-the-counter medicines like paracetamol and ibuprofen
  • triptans – medicines that can help reverse the changes in the brain that may cause migraines
  • anti-emetics – medicines often used to help relieve people's feeling of sickness (nausea) or being sick

During an attack, many people find that sleeping or lying in a darkened room can also help.

Read more on the NHS website.

You may be able to reduce your migraines by avoiding things that tend to cause them. Eating and sleeping well and regular exercise can also help.

Read more on the NHS website.

It's not entirely clear what causes migraines. They're known to be triggered by periods, stress, tiredness and certain foods or drinks.

Read more on the NHS website.