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Symptoms

The severity of agoraphobia can vary significantly between individuals.

For example, someone with severe agoraphobia may be unable to leave the house, whereas someone who has mild agoraphobia may be able to travel short distances without problems.

The symptoms of agoraphobia can be broadly classified into 3 types:

Physical symptoms

The physical symptoms of agoraphobia usually only occur when you find yourself in a situation or environment that causes anxiety.

However, many people with agoraphobia rarely experience physical symptoms because they deliberately avoid situations that make them anxious.

The physical symptoms of agoraphobia can be similar to those of a panic attack and may include:

Cognitive symptoms

The cognitive symptoms of agoraphobia are feelings or thoughts that can be, but aren't always, related to the physical symptoms.

Cognitive symptoms may include fear that:

There are also psychological symptoms that aren't related to panic attacks, such as:

Behavioural symptoms

Symptoms of agoraphobia relating to behaviour include:

Some people are able to force themselves to confront uncomfortable situations, but they feel considerable fear and anxiety while doing so.

When to seek medical advice

Speak to your GP if you think you have the symptoms of agoraphobia.

You should also seek medical advice if you have any of the following: