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Treatment

Syphilis is a type of sexually transmitted infection.

Symptoms of syphilis include small sores around your genitals or bottom, a rash (usually on your hands or feet) and white patches in your mouth.

Syphilis is treated with an antibiotic injection or antibiotic tablets.

Syphilis is mainly spread through vaginal, anal or oral sex, or by sharing sex toys with someone who's infected.

You can reduce your chances of getting syphilis by using a condom or a dental dam during sex, including oral sex, and not sharing sex toys.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of syphilis include small sores around your genitals or bottom, a rash (usually on your hands or feet) and white patches in your mouth.

Symptoms of syphilis

The symptoms of syphilis are not always obvious and may eventually disappear, but you'll usually remain infected unless you get treated.

Some people with syphilis have no symptoms.

Symptoms can include:

If it's left untreated for years, syphilis can spread to the brain or other parts of the body and cause serious long-term problems.

Read more on the NHS website.

Syphilis is treated with an antibiotic injection or antibiotic tablets.

Medical treatments

Syphilis is usually treated with either:

  • an injection of antibiotics into your buttocks – most people will only need 1 dose, although 3 injections given at weekly intervals may be recommended if you have had syphilis for a long time
  • a course of antibiotics tablets if you cannot have the injection – this will usually last 2 or 4 weeks, depending on how long you have had syphilis 

You should avoid any kind of sexual activity or close sexual contact with another person until at least 2 weeks after your treatment finishes.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can reduce your chances of getting syphilis by using a condom or a dental dam during sex, including oral sex, and not sharing sex toys.

Read more on the NHS website.

Syphilis is mainly spread through vaginal, anal or oral sex, or by sharing sex toys with someone who's infected.

Read more on the NHS website.