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Symptoms

Frontotemporal dementia usually causes changes in behaviour or language problems at first.

These come on gradually and get worse slowly over time.

Eventually, most people will experience problems in both of these areas. Some people also develop physical problems and difficulties with their mental abilities.

Behaviour and personality changes

Many people with frontotemporal dementia develop a number of unusual behaviours they're not aware of.

These can include:

As the condition progresses, people with frontotemporal dementia may become socially isolated and withdrawn.

Language problems

Some people experience problems with speech and language, including:

Some people gradually lose the ability to speak, and can eventually become completely mute.

Problems with mental abilities

Problems with thinking don't tend to occur in the early stages of frontotemporal dementia, but these often develop as the condition progresses.

These can include:

Physical problems

In the later stages, some people with frontotemporal dementia develop physical problems and difficulties with movement.

These can include:

Some people have frontotemporal dementia overlapping with other neurological (nerve and brain) problems, including:

Getting medical advice

See your GP if you think you have early symptoms of dementia. If you're worried about someone else, encourage them to make an appointment with their GP and perhaps suggest you go with them.

Your GP can do some simple checks to try to find out the cause of your symptoms, and may refer you to a specialist for further tests.

It's usually very helpful to have someone at the consultation who knows you well and can give the specialist another perspective on your symptoms.

Read more about:

Getting a dementia diagnosis

Tests used to diagnose dementia

Advice if you're worried someone else could have dementia