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Treatment

Pancreatic cancer is a type of cancer that starts in the pancreas, an organ near the stomach.

Symptoms of pancreatic cancer include pain in the back or stomach, unintended weight loss and yellowing of the skin and eyes.

The main treatments for pancreatic cancer are surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of pancreatic cancer include pain in the back or stomach, unintended weight loss and yellowing of the skin and eyes.

Symptoms of pancreatic cancer

In the early stages, a tumour in the pancreas does not usually cause any symptoms, which can make it difficult to diagnose.

The first noticeable symptoms of pancreatic cancer are often:

Other possible symptoms of pancreatic cancer include:

It's important to remember that these symptoms can be caused by many different conditions and are not usually the result of cancer.

But you should contact a GP if you're concerned or these symptoms start suddenly.

You may also develop symptoms of diabetes if you have pancreatic cancer. This is because the tumour can stop the pancreas producing insulin as it normally would.

Read more on the NHS website.

The main treatments for pancreatic cancer are surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Medical treatments

Cancer of the pancreas is difficult to treat. It rarely causes any symptoms in the early stages, so it's often not detected until the cancer is fairly advanced.

If the tumour is large or has spread to other areas in the body, treating the cancer will be more difficult.

If you have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, your treatment will depend on the type and location of your cancer and how far it's advanced, also known as its stage.

Your age, general health and personal preferences will also be taken into consideration.

The 3 main treatments for pancreatic cancer are:

You may also be offered a clinical trial.

Some stages of pancreatic cancer only require 1 form of treatment, whereas others may require 2 types of treatment or a combination of all 3.

Read more on the NHS website.