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Diagnosis

Miscarriage is the loss of a pregnancy during the first 23 weeks.

Symptoms of miscarriage include vaginal bleeding, cramps and pain in the lower part of your tummy (abdomen).

Miscarriage does not usually need treatment. Sometimes medicines or surgery are needed to remove any remaining pregnancy tissue.

Miscarriages can happen for a number of reasons, such as problems with the unborn baby, a health condition in the mother, or an infection.

Most miscarriages cannot be prevented. You can reduce your risk by not smoking, not drinking alcohol, not taking drugs and by being a healthy weight.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of miscarriage include vaginal bleeding, cramps and pain in the lower part of your tummy (abdomen).

Symptoms of a miscarriage

The main sign of a miscarriage is vaginal bleeding, which may be followed by cramping and pain in your lower abdomen.

If you have vaginal bleeding, contact a GP or your midwife.

Most GPs can refer you to an early pregnancy unit at your local hospital straight away if necessary.

You may be referred to a maternity ward if your pregnancy is at a later stage.

But bear in mind that light vaginal bleeding is relatively common during the first trimester (first 3 months) of pregnancy and does not necessarily mean you're having a miscarriage.

Read more on the NHS website.

Miscarriage does not usually need treatment. Sometimes medicines or surgery are needed to remove any remaining pregnancy tissue.

Medical treatments

If you have the symptoms of a miscarriage, you'll usually be referred to a hospital for tests.

In most cases, an ultrasound scan can determine if you're having a miscarriage.

When a miscarriage is confirmed, you'll need to talk to your doctor or midwife about the options for the management of the end of the pregnancy.

Often the pregnancy tissue will pass out naturally in 1 or 2 weeks.

Sometimes medicine to assist the passage of the tissue may be recommended, or you can choose to have minor surgery to remove it if you do not want to wait.

Read more on the NHS website.

Most miscarriages cannot be prevented. You can reduce your risk by not smoking, not drinking alcohol, not taking drugs and by being a healthy weight.

Read more on the NHS website.

Miscarriages can happen for a number of reasons, such as problems with the unborn baby, a health condition in the mother, or an infection.

Read more on the NHS website.