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Diagnosis

Pelvic inflammatory disease is an infection of the upper genital tract, including the womb, ovaries and connecting tubes.

Symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease include pain in the tummy, pain when peeing and heavy or painful periods.

Pelvic inflammatory disease is treated with antibiotics. Getting treated as soon as symptoms appear increases the chances of a full recovery.

Many cases of pelvic inflammatory disease are caused by a sexually transmitted infection, such as chlamydia or gonorrhoea.

You can reduce your risk of pelvic inflammatory disease by always using condoms with a new sexual partner.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease include pain in the tummy, pain when peeing and heavy or painful periods.

Symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

PID often does not cause any obvious symptoms.

Most women have mild symptoms that may include 1 or more of the following:

A few women become very ill with:

Read more on the NHS website.

Pelvic inflammatory disease is treated with antibiotics. Getting treated as soon as symptoms appear increases the chances of a full recovery.

Medical treatments

If diagnosed at an early stage, PID can be treated with a course of antibiotics, which usually lasts for 14 days.

You'll be given a mixture of antibiotics to cover the most likely infections, and often an injection as well as tablets.

It's important to complete the whole course and avoid having sexual intercourse during this time to help ensure the infection clears.

Your recent sexual partners also need to be tested and treated to stop the infection coming back or being spread to others.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can reduce your risk of pelvic inflammatory disease by always using condoms with a new sexual partner.

Read more on the NHS website.

Many cases of pelvic inflammatory disease are caused by a sexually transmitted infection, such as chlamydia or gonorrhoea.

Read more on the NHS website.