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Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted infection.

Not everyone with chlamydia has symptoms. Common symptoms include unusual discharge from your vagina or penis and pain when peeing.

Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics. You can get treatment from a sexual health clinic.

Chlamydia is mainly spread through unprotected vaginal, oral or anal sex. If you’re pregnant, you can also pass it to your baby.

You can help to prevent chlamydia by using a condom during sex and not sharing sex toys.

Read more on the NHS website.

Not everyone with chlamydia has symptoms. Common symptoms include unusual discharge from your vagina or penis and pain when peeing.

Symptoms of chlamydia

Most people with chlamydia do not notice any symptoms and do not know they have it.

If you do develop symptoms, you may experience:

If you think you're at risk of having a sexually transmitted infection (STI) or have any symptoms of chlamydia, visit a GP, community contraceptive service or local genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinic to get tested.

Read more on the NHS website.

Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics. You can get treatment from a sexual health clinic.

Medical treatments

Chlamydia can usually be treated easily with antibiotics.

You may be given some tablets to take all on 1 day, or a longer course of capsules to take for a week.

You should not have sex until you and your current sexual partner have finished treatment.

If you had the 1-day course of treatment, you should avoid having sex for a week afterwards.

It's important that your current sexual partner and any other recent sexual partners you have had are also tested and treated to help stop the spread of the infection.

Under-25s who have chlamydia should be offered another test around 3 months after being treated.

This is because young adults who test positive for chlamydia are at increased risk of catching it again.

Sexual health or genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics can help you contact your sexual partners.

Either you or the clinic can speak to them, or they can be sent a note advising them to get tested.

The note will not have your name on it, so your confidentiality will be protected.

Read more on the NHS website.

You can help to prevent chlamydia by using a condom during sex and not sharing sex toys.

Read more on the NHS website.

Chlamydia is mainly spread through unprotected vaginal, oral or anal sex. If you’re pregnant, you can also pass it to your baby.

Read more on the NHS website.