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Blisters

Blisters are fluid-filled bumps under your skin that you can get if your skin is damaged.

Blisters are lumps under your skin that can be filled with clear fluid, blood or pus.

A blister will usually heal on its own if you cover it with a plaster or dressing and do not burst it. If it's very big or painful, a GP may drain it.

Read more on the NHS website.

Blisters are lumps under your skin that can be filled with clear fluid, blood or pus.

Check if you have a blister

Blister 1
Blisters are small pockets of clear fluid under a layer of skin.

Blister 2
Blood blisters are red or black and filled with blood instead of clear fluid.

Blister 3
If the blister is infected it can be red, hot and filled with green or yellow pus.

Important

Don't ignore an infected blister. Without treatment it could lead to a skin or blood infection.

Read more on the NHS website.

A blister will usually heal on its own if you cover it with a plaster or dressing and do not burst it. If it's very big or painful, a GP may drain it.

Self-care

To relieve any pain, use an ice pack (or a bag of frozen vegetables wrapped in a towel) on the blister for up to 30 minutes.

To protect the blister and help prevent infection:


Do

  • cover blisters that are likely to burst with a soft plaster or dressing
  • wash your hands before touching a burst blister
  • allow the fluid in a burst blister to drain before covering it with a plaster or dressing

Don't

  • do not burst a blister yourself
  • do not peel the skin off a burst blister
  • do not pick at the edges of the remaining skin
  • do not wear the shoes or use the equipment that caused your blister until it heals

Medical treatments

Your GP might burst a large or painful blister using a sterilised needle. If your blister is infected, they may prescribe antibiotics.

They can also offer treatment and advice if blisters are caused by a medical condition.

Read more on the NHS website.