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Diagnosis

Alcohol-related liver disease is where your liver is damaged by drinking too much alcohol.

There are no symptoms of alcohol-related liver disease at first. Symptoms like weight loss and swollen ankles may appear later on.

Stopping drinking can help improve alcohol-related liver disease. A liver transplant may be needed if the damage to the liver is severe.

The best way to prevent alcohol-related liver disease is to stop drinking alcohol or stick to the alcohol limits recommended by the NHS.

Read more on the NHS website.

There are no symptoms of alcohol-related liver disease at first. Symptoms like weight loss and swollen ankles may appear later on.

Symptoms of alcohol-related liver disease (ARLD)

ARLD does not usually cause any symptoms until the liver has been severely damaged.

When this happens, symptoms can include:

This means ARLD is frequently diagnosed during tests for other conditions, or at a stage of advanced liver damage.

If you regularly drink alcohol to excess, tell your GP so they can check if your liver is damaged.

Read more on the NHS website.

Stopping drinking can help improve alcohol-related liver disease. A liver transplant may be needed if the damage to the liver is severe.

Medical treatments

There's currently no specific medical treatment for ARLD. The main treatment is to stop drinking, preferably for the rest of your life.

This reduces the risk of further damage to your liver and gives it the best chance of recovering.

If a person is dependent on alcohol, stopping drinking can be very difficult.

But support, advice and medical treatment may be available through local alcohol support services.

liver transplant may be required in severe cases where the liver has stopped functioning and does not improve when you stop drinking alcohol.

You'll only be considered for a liver transplant if you have developed complications of cirrhosis despite having stopped drinking.

All liver transplant units require a person to not drink alcohol while awaiting the transplant, and for the rest of their life.

Read more on the NHS website.

The best way to prevent alcohol-related liver disease is to stop drinking alcohol or stick to the alcohol limits recommended by the NHS.

Read more on the NHS website.