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Symptoms

Hepatitis B is an infection of the liver caused by a virus.

Hepatitis B does not always have symptoms. Possible symptoms of an infection include a high temperature, feeling sick, diarrhoea and tummy pain.

Hepatitis B sometimes gets better without treatment. It if lasts a long time, you may need medicines to keep the virus under control.

Hepatitis B is spread in blood and bodily fluids. Ways it can be spread include having sex without a condom and sharing needles.

There is a vaccine that can help prevent hepatitis B. The vaccine is offered on the NHS to all babies born in the UK and some people at high risk.

Read more on the NHS website.

Hepatitis B does not always have symptoms. Possible symptoms of an infection include a high temperature, feeling sick, diarrhoea and tummy pain.

Symptoms of hepatitis B

Many people with hepatitis B will not experience any symptoms and may fight off the virus without realising they had it.

If symptoms do develop, they tend to happen 2 or 3 months after exposure to the hepatitis B virus.

Symptoms of hepatitis B include:

These symptoms will usually pass within 1 to 3 months (acute hepatitis B), although occasionally the infection can last for 6 months or more (chronic hepatitis B).

Read more on the NHS website.

Hepatitis B sometimes gets better without treatment. It if lasts a long time, you may need medicines to keep the virus under control.

Medical treatments

Treatment for hepatitis B depends on how long you have been infected for.

If you have been exposed to the virus in the past few days, emergency treatment can help stop you becoming infected.

If you have only had the infection for a few weeks or months (acute hepatitis B), you may only need treatment to relieve your symptoms while your body fights off the infection.

If you have had the infection for more than 6 months (chronic hepatitis B), you may be offered treatment with medicines that can keep the virus under control and reduce the risk of liver damage.

Chronic hepatitis B often requires long-term or lifelong treatment and regular monitoring to check for any further liver problems.

Read more on the NHS website.

There is a vaccine that can help prevent hepatitis B. The vaccine is offered on the NHS to all babies born in the UK and some people at high risk.

Read more on the NHS website.

Hepatitis B is spread in blood and bodily fluids. Ways it can be spread include having sex without a condom and sharing needles.

Read more on the NHS website.