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Cervical cancer is a cancer in the cervix, the opening of the womb from the vagina.

An early sign of cervical cancer is unusual vaginal bleeding, such as bleeding after sex or between periods. But you do not always get symptoms.

Treatments for cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

Almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by a very common and usually harmless virus called human papillomavirus.

Read more on the NHS website.

An early sign of cervical cancer is unusual vaginal bleeding, such as bleeding after sex or between periods. But you do not always get symptoms.

Symptoms of cervical cancer

Cancer of the cervix often has no symptoms in its early stages.

If you do have symptoms, the most common is abnormal vaginal bleeding, which can occur during or after sex, in between periods, or new bleeding after you have been through the menopause.

Abnormal bleeding does not mean you have cervical cancer, but you should see a GP as soon as possible to get it checked out.

If a GP thinks you might have cervical cancer, you should be referred to see a specialist within 2 weeks.

Read more on the NHS website.

Treatments for cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

Medical treatments

If cervical cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, it's usually possible to treat it using surgery.

In some cases, it's possible to leave the womb in place, but it may need to be removed.

The surgical procedure used to remove the womb is called a hysterectomy.

Radiotherapy is another option for some women with early-stage cervical cancer.

In some cases, it's used alongside surgery or chemotherapy, or both.

More advanced cases of cervical cancer are usually treated using a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Some of the treatments can have significant and long-lasting side effects, including early menopause and infertility.

Read more on the NHS website.

Almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by a very common and usually harmless virus called human papillomavirus.

Read more on the NHS website.