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Prevention

Trichomoniasis is a type of sexually transmitted infection caused by a tiny parasite.

Symptoms of trichomoniasis include pain when peeing, sore or itchy genitals, and abnormal discharge from your vagina or penis.

Trichomoniasis can usually be treated with antibiotics. You can get treatment from a sexual health clinic or GP.

Trichomoniasis is usually spread by having sex without a condom or sharing sex toys.

Read more on the NHS website.

Symptoms of trichomoniasis include pain when peeing, sore or itchy genitals, and abnormal discharge from your vagina or penis.

Symptoms of trichomoniasis

Symptoms of trichomoniasis usually develop within a month of infection.

But up to half of all people will not develop any symptoms (though they can still pass the infection on to others).

The symptoms of trichomoniasis are similar to those of many other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so it can sometimes be difficult to diagnose.

Symptoms in women

Trichomoniasis in women can cause:

Symptoms in men

Trichomoniasis in men can cause:

Read more on the NHS website.

Trichomoniasis can usually be treated with antibiotics. You can get treatment from a sexual health clinic or GP.

Medical treatments

Trichomoniasis is unlikely to go away without treatment, but it can be effectively treated with antibiotics.

Most men and women are treated with an antibiotic called metronidazole, which is usually taken twice a day for 5 to 7 days.

It's important to complete the whole course of antibiotics and avoid having sex until the infection clears up to prevent reinfection.

Your current sexual partner and any other recent partners should also be treated.

Read more on the NHS website.

Trichomoniasis is usually spread by having sex without a condom or sharing sex toys.

Read more on the NHS website.