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Psychosis

Psychosis is where you see or hear things that are not there (hallucinations) or believe things that are not true (delusions).

The main symptoms of psychosis are hallucinations and delusions.

Common treatments for psychosis include antipsychotic medicines, talking therapies and social support.

Common causes of psychosis include mental health conditions like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Read more on the NHS website.

The main symptoms of psychosis are hallucinations and delusions.

Symptoms of psychosis

The 2 main symptoms of psychosis are:

The combination of hallucinations and delusional thinking can cause severe distress and a change in behaviour.

Experiencing the symptoms of psychosis is often referred to as having a psychotic episode.

Read more on the NHS website.

Common treatments for psychosis include antipsychotic medicines, talking therapies and social support.

Medical treatments

Treatment for psychosis involves using a combination of:

  • antipsychotic medication – which can help relieve the symptoms of psychosis
  • psychological therapies – the 1 to 1 talking therapy cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has proved successful in helping people with psychosis, and family interventions (a form of therapy that may involve partners, family members and close friends) have been shown to reduce the need for hospital treatment in people with psychosis
  • social support – support with social needs, such as education, employment or accommodation

After an episode of psychosis, most people who get better with medication need to continue taking it for at least a year.

Around 50% of people need to take long-term medication to prevent symptoms coming back.

If a person's psychotic episodes are severe, they may need to be admitted to a psychiatric hospital for treatment.

Read more on the NHS website.

Common causes of psychosis include mental health conditions like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Read more on the NHS website.