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Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)

Body dysmorphic disorder, or body dysmorphia, is a mental health condition where you spend a lot of time worrying about your appearance.

You may have body dysmorphic disorder if you worry a lot about how a specific part of your body looks and it affects your daily life.

Treatments for body dysmorphic disorder include talking therapies and antidepressants.

The exact cause of body dysmorphic disorder is unclear. It's been linked to genes, chemical changes in the brain and traumatic past experiences.

Read more on the NHS website.

You may have body dysmorphic disorder if you worry a lot about how a specific part of your body looks and it affects your daily life.

Symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)

You might have BDD if you:

BDD can seriously affect your daily life, including your work, social life and relationships.

BDD can also lead to depression, self-harm and even thoughts of suicide.

Read more on the NHS website.

Treatments for body dysmorphic disorder include talking therapies and antidepressants.

Medical treatments

The symptoms of BDD can get better with treatment.

If you have relatively mild symptoms of BDD, you should be referred for a type of talking therapy called cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), which you have either on your own or in a group.

If you have moderate symptoms of BDD, you should be offered either CBT or a type of antidepressant medication called a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI).

If you have more severe symptoms of BDD or other treatments do not work, you should be offered CBT together with an SSRI.

Self-care

Support groups for BDD

Some people may find it helpful to contact or join a support group for information, advice and practical tips on coping with BDD.

You can ask your doctor if there are any groups in your area, and the BDD Foundation has a directory of local and online BDD support groups.

You may also find the following organisations to be useful sources of information and advice:

Mental wellbeing

Practising mindfulness exercises may help you if you're feeling low or anxious.

Some people also find it helpful to get together with friends or family, or to try doing something new to improve their mental wellbeing.

It may also be helpful to try some relaxation and breathing exercises to relieve stress and anxiety.

Read more on the NHS website.

The exact cause of body dysmorphic disorder is unclear. It's been linked to genes, chemical changes in the brain and traumatic past experiences.

Read more on the NHS website.